The Fall Semester is Here… and so is Quizlet!

Welcome back, instructors!

This week’s newsletter connects to Quizlet, this week’s Cool Instructional Technology series.


 Helping Students Memorize: Tips from Cognitive Science

exam review session

“…memorization deserves some airtime because it is one important route to building content knowledge and expertise. Furthermore, acquiring content knowledge doesn’t have to detract from critical thinking, reasoning, or innovation…”

Major tips:  Emphasize context and purpose; visualize information; avoid the rereading trap (passive rereading).


Reminder of just a few of the general FCTL services available to all instructors…

One on One consults: Let’s talk! Teaching tough concepts, developing class activities, grading, balancing your time between job and teaching, etc., we’re happy to chat about ways to support you personally. (0.5-1.5 hour)

Classroom Observations: Having an issue or just want the thoughts of another instructor? We’ll arrange to see a class session, or observe online for 2 weeks, then give you feedback. We can also help you add and/or assess anything you want to try out for the next semester (or next week!).

Syllabus Review: Send us your syllabus for fast applicable feedback (turnover within 5 days).

Classroom Demonstrations: We can demonstrate any technology you would like to use in the classroom, from online polling to Blackboard and assignment creation tools.

Adjunct Get Together

Adjunct Get Together - August 9, 2017

The annual adjunct get together is an opportunity for new and current adjunct instructors to meet and share ideas for instruction and strategies from past experience. This fall’s event was held at Skytop Office Building. Below are handouts shared during the event, and a general summary of open discussion topics suggested by senior adjuncts (including electronic device use policy, plagiarism, international students, and group/team management).

Adjunct Get Together Handouts
Adjunct Get Together Recording

VIDEO

To be added.

Adobe Spark – Part of the Cool Instructional Tools Series

Adobe Spark - Part of the Cool Instructional Tools Series

Adobe Spark allows both web and mobile users to create and share visual content – like posts for social media, graphics, web stories, and animated videos. The goal with the new Spark suite is to allow anyone, including instructors and students, the ability to create and share visual stories without needing to be professional designers. The tools also don’t require a lot of time to use.

Adobe Spark Handouts
Group Learning Techniques Event Recording
Director of Instructional Design and Technology Integration, Jeff Fouts, from the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University discusses how Adobe Spark allows both web and mobile users to create and share visual content – like posts for social media, graphics, web stories, and animated videos to help engage students with course content.

Reading Across the Curriculum

Reading Across the Curriculum

Do your students really know how to effectively complete their readings? We shared ways to help students focus: read/think/highlight/analyze. Specifically, 1) how to prepare students for reading comprehension and analysis, 2) proper highlighting techniques, and 3) using analyzed information to pull out main concepts and talking points. Additionally, we shared: 1) how students should study and 2) how they can predict questions for exams from the text.

Reading Across the Curriculum Handouts
Reading Across the Curriculum Event Recording
Director of the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, Peggy Takach, from the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University discusses the question: Do your students really know how to effectively complete their readings? Techniques were shared to help students focus on read/think/highlight/analyze.

Giving Voice in a Loud World: Using Video to Support Individual Reflection and Peer Exchange – featuring Ingrid Erickson

Giving Voice in a Loud World: Using Video to Support Individual Reflection and Peer Exchange - featuring Ingrid Erickson

FlipGrid is a online space for group interaction that allows students to create brief video diaries and share them with one another. Not only does this promote the value of thoughtful reflection at the individual level, it also enables sociality and peer learning at the group level. And it’s fun!

Giving Voice in a Loud World: Using Video to Support Individual Reflection and Peer Exchange Handouts
Giving Voice in a Loud World: Using Video to Support Individual Reflection and Peer Exchange Event Recording
Assistant Professor Ingrid Erickson describes using FlipGrid as an online space for group interaction that allows student to create brief video diaries and share them with one another. Not only does this promote the value of thoughtful reflection at the individual level, it also enables sociality and peer learning at the group level.

Assessment Series 1: Backward Design, Rubrics First – featuring Megan Oakleaf

Assessment Series 1: Backward Design, Rubrics First - featuring Megan Oakleaf

In this session, attendees considered rubric content and design before they began determining assessment activities and in-class structure. Discussion included types of rubrics (analytical and holistic) and why you might choose one type over another. Rubric examples of each type were distributed.

Backward Design, Rubrics First Handout

Assessment Series 2: Backward Design, Imagine Your Classroom

Assessment Series 2: Backward Design, Imagine Your Classroom

This session focused on different ways to assess learning in the classroom such as balancing rigor with different student expectations of explicit assessment. Attendees received a matrix that can be used as a guide to map an interconnection of rubrics and assessment activities in a big picture view of the course and how it functions.

Backward Design, Imagine Your Classroom Handouts
Backward Design, Imagine Your Classroom Recording
In this session, Peggy Takach, Director of the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at the iSchool at Syracuse University discussed different ways to assess learning in the classroom such as balancing rigor with different student expectations of explicit assessment.

Assessment Series 3: Backward Design, Finally Blackboard – Using Interactive Rubrics in Blackboard Learn

Assessment Series 3: Backward Design, Finally Blackboard - Using Interactive Rubrics in Blackboard Learn

 

 

This session focuses on using Interactive Rubrics in Blackboard Learn – What they are, how to set them up, and how to grade using them.

Using Interactive Rubrics in Blackboard Learn

 

Using Interactive Rubrics in Blackboard Learn Event Recording

 

Director of Instructional Design and Technology Integration, Jeff Fouts, from the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University discusses Interactive Rubrics in Blackboard - What they are, how to set them up, and how to grade using them.

IceBox Talk: Group Learning Techniques – featuring Bei Yu

IceBox Talk: Group Learning Techniques - featuring Bei Yu

This IceBox talk by Bei Yu, Associate Professor, introduced several groupwork techniques, such as how to form groups, prime group members on good collaboration behavior, and lead combined individual/group exercises through Blackboard discussion forums.

Group Learning Techniques Handouts
Group Learning Techniques Event Recording
Associate Professor Bei Yu introduces several groupwork techniques, such as how to form groups, prime group members on good collaboration behavior, and lead combined individual/group exercises through Blackboard discussion forums at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University.

Using the Reports in Blackboard Learn to Better Understand User Interaction

Using the Reports in Blackboard Learn to Better Understand User Interaction

This session considered the purpose of measuring student engagement. Activities were identified that not only engaged students but also produced quality analysis, which is critical to designing and adapting both online and face-to-face courses. Some of the questions that we will show you how to answer are: •When are students logging into my course? •Which course resources/tools are being used most frequently? •Which discussions boards generate the most traffic? •What are the patterns of performance in an online assessment? •What are some of my opportunities for improvement?

Using the Reports in Blackboard Learn to Better Understand User Interaction Handouts
Using the Reports in Blackboard Learn to Better Understand User Interaction Event Recording
Director of Instructional Design and Technology Integration, Jeff Fouts, from the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University discusses using the reports in Blackboard to better understand student interaction in a Blackboard course.